In Conversation with Architect and Urbanist Henrik Valeur

Interview by architectural journalist Niveditha Ravikumar in Zingy Homes, Tete-A-Tete with Experts, 26 October, 2015.

Henrik Valeur, the Nykredit Encouragement Prize winning Danish architect-urbanist is better known in India for his book – India: the Urban Transition – A Case Study of Development Urbanism, where he discusses and proposes solutions to some of the basic concerns of human existence – air, water, food, housing and mobility in urban Indian cities.

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Carnival we ought to grow out of

Article by Dr. Kuldip Dhiman in The Tribune, 2 August, 2015.

Henrik Valeur, a Danish urbanist and researcher who worked with an Indian Institute of Science team to create infrastructure for non-motorised transportation in Bangalore, also spent six months in Chandigarh in 2010. He studied how meeting places could be created in the periphery. Alongside, he came up with a project to make one sector vehicle-free and see its impact. Assisting him were Chandigarh College of Architecture students.

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Development Urbanism, Issues and possibilities: In Conversation with Henrik Valeur

Interview by Prof. Richa Sharma, Pillai College of Architecture, in Tekton Vol. 2, Issue 1, March 2015.

Henrik Valeur’s career straddles three distinct cultures and this has shaped his worldview about how cities function. He sees a great potential in urbanisation leading to change, particularly in the developing world. Valeur advocates a theory of urbanisation as a means to address poverty while safeguarding the environment, this theory he describes as ‘Development Urbanisation’.

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Social and Environmental Sustainability in Urban India

Talk by Henrik Valeur at Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi.

12 March 2015.

Abstract: With rural-to-urban migration and urban-to-rural remittance, the number of people affected by traditional “rural” ills, such as undernourishment and infectious diseases, may decline. However, if cities and urban cultures are not properly developed and maintained, “rural” ills may simply be replaced by “urban” ills, such as stress, physical inactivity and social isolation, which may bring about even more suffering.

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